June 2017 - Dr. Katie McLaughlin, Stress and Development Lab Director, speaks with the BBC about how poverty influences children’s brain development and their chances for success in life.

June 1, 2017
Dr. Katie McLaughlin, Stress and Development Lab Director, speaks with the BBC World Service about how poverty influences children’s brain development and their chances for success in life.  You can listen to the story here: 
 

 

May 2017 - Dr. Katie McLaughlin, lab director, gives the 12th annual Edwards Lecture for the UW Department of Psychology.

May 31, 2017
Each year, the Psychology Department hosts the Edwards Lecture series for the community.  In 2017, the topic of these lectures was Improving Society through Brain Science.  The lectures cover 3 topics each year, including one talk from a UW Psychology Professor paired with one talk from an outside expert.  Dr. Katie McLaughlin, Director of the Stress and Development Lab, gave one of these lectures on the topic of Environmental Experience and Brain Development.  You can find a video recording of all six of the lectures here:
 
 
Dr. McLaughlin’s talk can be found here: 
 

May 2017 -Stress and Development Lab Research cited by Sheryl Sandberg in the New York Times

May 18, 2017
Sheryl Sandberg writes about how to build resilience in children after a loss in the New York Times.  She cites Stress and Development Lab research in the article!  Click on the link for “harm and deprivation” to read more.
 

May 2017 - Natalie Colich joins the lab as a post-doc and receives a National Research Service Award from the National Institute of Mental Health.

May 12, 2017
Natalie Colich will be joining the Stress and Development Lab as a post-doc in fall 2017 after completing her PhD at Stanford.  She was awarded a National Research Service Award from the National Institute of Mental Health that will begin in fall 2017 when she joins the lab.  The project is entitled “Neurodevelopmental Mechanisms linking Childhood Adversity with Adolescent Psychopathology: Pubertal Timing and Cortico-Limbic Circuitry.”  The grant will identify mechanisms through which childhood adversity, pubertal timing, and brain development influence risk for psychopathology in adolescents. Specifically, Natalie will examine how different dimension of childhood adversity influence pubertal timing, investigate whether pubertal timing is a mechanism explaining the association between non-normative pubertal timing and adolescent psychopathology, and evaluate whether pubertal timing-related changes in cortical-limbic circuitry mediate the association between childhood adversity and adolescent psychopathology.

April 2017 - Stress and Development Lab Research is featured as a Science Brief by the American Psychological Association.

April 21, 2017
Stress and Development Lab Research is featured as a Science Brief by the American Psychological Association.  Read more about the Long Shadow of Childhood Adversity, as discussed by Dr. Katie McLaughlin, Director of the Stress and Development Lab, here:
 

February 2017 - Kate McLaughlin, Director of the Stress and Development Lab, discusses the findings from a recent lab paper demonstrating the importance of sensitivity to reward as a protective factor for adolescents who have experienced maltreatment.

February 27, 2017

Kate McLaughlin, Director of the Stress and Development Lab, discusses the findings from a recent lab paper demonstrating the importance of sensitivity to reward as a protective factor for adolescents who have experienced maltreatment.  The paper was led by Meg Dennison, a post-doctoral fellow in the lab.  The findings suggest that adolescents who have high sensitivity to environmental rewards - at both behavioral and neural levels - are less likely to develop depression after experiencing maltreatment than adolescents who are less sensitive to reward.  These findings highlight novel avenues for intervention with children who have experienced maltreatment and suggest that interventions targeting reward processing - like behavioral activation - might be particularly helpful in preventing the onset of depression.

For more details, see link: http://bold.expert/adolescent-reward-sensitivity-protector-rather-than-risk/

November 2016 - Lab Director Katie McLaughlin edits a special issue on Mechanisms Linking Early-Life Adversity with Physical Health

November 8, 2016
Lab Director Katie McLaughlin was the Guest Editor of a special issue of Psychosomatic Medicine on Mechanisms Linking Early-Life Adversity with Physical Health along with Nicole Bush and Richard Lane. In the last 2 decades, a veritable explosion of research into the early-life determinants of physical health has demonstrated that social and environmental factors in early life play a critical role in predicting morbidity and mortality across the life course. In particular, exposure to adverse experiences in childhood—including poverty, abuse, neglect, and violence—has been associated with elevated risk for the onset of a wide range of physical health problems in adulthood. Despite strong evidence for the links between early-life adversity and health outcomes, the mechanisms that underlie these associations remain poorly understood. Exploring these mechanisms is the goal of this special issue of Psychosomatic Medicine.  The articles in this special issue draw upon a diverse set of samples to examine a wide range of potential mechanisms operating at multiple levels of influence, spanning physiological and psychosocial pathways that might underlie the associations of early adversity with health.
 
Articles from the special issue are freely available for the next month here:
 

November 2016 - Maya Rosen, Post-Doc, receives a National Research Service Award from the National Institute on Child Health and Development.

November 7, 2016

Maya Rosen, a postdoc in the Stress and Development Lab, has been awarded a National Research Service Award from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Her project is entitled “Long-Term Memory-Guided Attention: Development, Environmental Factors, and Neural Underpinnings.”Intact coordination between long-term memory and attention is essential for normal cognitive functioning. Development of this coordination in children is understudied and almost nothing known about the environmental factors that contribute to its development. Maya’s proposed studies will investigate the behavioral and neural development of long-term memory-guided attention from childhood to adolescence and the association of early life cognitive deprivation with this development; study findings have the potential to inform interventions to improve cognitive and academic outcomes for children raised in poverty.

May 2016- Graduate students Charlotte Heleniak and Hilary Lambert won poster awards at the 2016 Association for Psychological Science meeting in Chicago.

July 6, 2016

The Society for the Science of Clinical Psychology holds an annual poster competition at the Association for Psychological Science meeting.  Graduate students from the Stress and Development Lab Charlotte Heleniak and Hilary Lambert were among the four graduate students who won poster awards out of nearly 100 submissions.  Congrats Charlotte and Hilary!!

March 2016 - Honors Student Victoria Chambers is honored for her research and clinical work with children who have experienced trauma.

March 2, 2016

Honors Student Victoria Chambers is honored for her research and clinical work with children who have experienced trauma.  Read the story here: "Taking on Childhood Trauma" http://www.washington.edu/boundless/taking-on-childhood-trauma/