March 2017 - Dr. Katie McLaughlin speaks about the neuroscience of trauma and adversity to journalists at the Dart Center at the Columbia Journalism School participating in the reporting institute on Early Experience and the Developing Brain.

March 10, 2017
Dr. Katie McLaughlin, Lab Director, speaks about the neuroscience of trauma and adversity to journalists at the Dart Center at the Columbia Journalism School participating in the reporting institute on Early Experience and the Developing Brain.  Journalists from 26 countries participated in the institute, which was designed for reporters covering a wide range of issues, from local education and social policy to refugees, conflict and international public health. It focused on advancements in neuroscience and their implications for child development, concentrating especially on vulnerable children living in poverty and constantly changing, unstable environments. 
 
Watch Dr. McLaughlin’s talk, along with talks by Kimberly Noble (Columbia University) and Ann Masten (University of Minnesota) here (advance to talk 4 of 14):
 

February 2017 - Kate McLaughlin, Director of the Stress and Development Lab, discusses the findings from a recent lab paper demonstrating the importance of sensitivity to reward as a protective factor for adolescents who have experienced maltreatment.

February 27, 2017

Kate McLaughlin, Director of the Stress and Development Lab, discusses the findings from a recent lab paper demonstrating the importance of sensitivity to reward as a protective factor for adolescents who have experienced maltreatment.  The paper was led by Meg Dennison, a post-doctoral fellow in the lab.  The findings suggest that adolescents who have high sensitivity to environmental rewards - at both behavioral and neural levels - are less likely to develop depression after experiencing maltreatment than adolescents who are less sensitive to reward.  These findings highlight novel avenues for intervention with children who have experienced maltreatment and suggest that interventions targeting reward processing - like behavioral activation - might be particularly helpful in preventing the onset of depression.

For more details, see link: http://bold.expert/adolescent-reward-sensitivity-protector-rather-than-risk/

November 2016 - Lab Director Katie McLaughlin edits a special issue on Mechanisms Linking Early-Life Adversity with Physical Health

November 8, 2016
Lab Director Katie McLaughlin was the Guest Editor of a special issue of Psychosomatic Medicine on Mechanisms Linking Early-Life Adversity with Physical Health along with Nicole Bush and Richard Lane. In the last 2 decades, a veritable explosion of research into the early-life determinants of physical health has demonstrated that social and environmental factors in early life play a critical role in predicting morbidity and mortality across the life course. In particular, exposure to adverse experiences in childhood—including poverty, abuse, neglect, and violence—has been associated with elevated risk for the onset of a wide range of physical health problems in adulthood. Despite strong evidence for the links between early-life adversity and health outcomes, the mechanisms that underlie these associations remain poorly understood. Exploring these mechanisms is the goal of this special issue of Psychosomatic Medicine.  The articles in this special issue draw upon a diverse set of samples to examine a wide range of potential mechanisms operating at multiple levels of influence, spanning physiological and psychosocial pathways that might underlie the associations of early adversity with health.
 
Articles from the special issue are freely available for the next month here:
 

November 2016 - Maya Rosen, Post-Doc, receives a National Research Service Award from the National Institute on Child Health and Development.

November 7, 2016

Maya Rosen, a postdoc in the Stress and Development Lab, has been awarded a National Research Service Award from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Her project is entitled “Long-Term Memory-Guided Attention: Development, Environmental Factors, and Neural Underpinnings.”Intact coordination between long-term memory and attention is essential for normal cognitive functioning. Development of this coordination in children is understudied and almost nothing known about the environmental factors that contribute to its development. Maya’s proposed studies will investigate the behavioral and neural development of long-term memory-guided attention from childhood to adolescence and the association of early life cognitive deprivation with this development; study findings have the potential to inform interventions to improve cognitive and academic outcomes for children raised in poverty.

May 2016- Graduate students Charlotte Heleniak and Hilary Lambert won poster awards at the 2016 Association for Psychological Science meeting in Chicago.

July 6, 2016

The Society for the Science of Clinical Psychology holds an annual poster competition at the Association for Psychological Science meeting.  Graduate students from the Stress and Development Lab Charlotte Heleniak and Hilary Lambert were among the four graduate students who won poster awards out of nearly 100 submissions.  Congrats Charlotte and Hilary!!

March 2016 - Honors Student Victoria Chambers is honored for her research and clinical work with children who have experienced trauma.

March 2, 2016

Honors Student Victoria Chambers is honored for her research and clinical work with children who have experienced trauma.  Read the story here: "Taking on Childhood Trauma" http://www.washington.edu/boundless/taking-on-childhood-trauma/

February 2016 - Dr. Katie McLaughlin wins the Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology from the American Psychological Association.

February 22, 2016

Dr. Katie McLaughlin wins the Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology from the American Psychological Association (APA).  The APA Distinguished Scientific Awards for an Early Career Contribution to Psychology honor early career scientists for contributions in the first nine years post-PhD.  These awards are given across 10 areas of psychology.  Dr. McLaughlin won the award in the area of Psychopathology.  Thank you to the APA for this incredible honor!

December 2015 - Stress and Development Lab research highlights pervasive exposure to trauma among US children and adolescents

December 2, 2015

Research conducted by the Stress and Development Lab has shown that more than 60% of children and adolescents in the United States will experience a traumatic event, such as being the victim of violence or a life-threatening accident or injury, by the time they reach adulthood.  This work identifies risk factors for trauma exposure as well as for the onset of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among youths who have experienced trauma.  The original paper can be found on the publications page (provide link to pdf to the McLaughlin et al, 2013 paper on trauma exposure and PTSD in a national sample).  The importance of this research for prevention of trauma and PTSD is reviewed by Marylene Cloitre and can be found here: (http://www.jneurosci.org/content/34/40/13435.full.pdf+html)

August 2015 - Lab Director Katie McLaughlin receives the Rising Star Award from the IMHRO One Mind Institute.

September 2, 2015

The IMHRO One Mind Institute Rising Star Awards aim to identify and funding critical and cutting edge research on the neural underpinnings of mental disorders.  Dr. McLaughlin will be examining Neural Mechanisms of Stress Vulnerability in Youth Depression and Anxiety Disorders with the award.  The Stress and Development Lab is thrilled to receive this support from the IMHRO One Mind Institute.

 

You can read more about the research project here: https://www.imhro.org/news/dr-katie-mclaughlin-understanding-how-stress-causes-anxiety-and-depression-youth

August 2015 - Charlotte Heleniak, 5th year graduate student, receives a National Research Service Award from the National Institute of Mental Health

August 25, 2015

Charlotte Heleniak, fifth year graduate student, has been awarded a Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Predoctoral Fellowship. These awards enable promising predoctoral students to obtain individualized, mentored research training from outstanding faculty sponsors while conducting dissertation research in scientific health-related fields relevant to the missions of the participating NIH Institutes and Centers. The NRSA will support Charlotte as she conducts her dissertation research study, “Child Maltreatment and Neurobiological Underpinnings Of Social Cognition” under the mentorship of Drs. Katie McLaughlin and Lori Zoellner. Congratulations Charlotte!